Spring 2015 Registration and Transfer Planning

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What? Registration for the Spring 2015 semester is already underway?

Believe it or not, registration for Parkland College Spring Semester 2015 began Monday at 8 a.m. Registration this week is restricted to current Parkland students, based on a schedule that was sent to all students via their Parkland email accounts about two weeks ago. Open enrollment will begin next week.

All degree-seeking students who have earned less than 30 credit hours are required to be advised before they can register for classes. Please note that earned credit hours do not include hours in which students are currently enrolled. Additionally, all students on academic probation and students in certain programs (health professions majors, for example) are also required to be advised before registering.

Advising guidelines are posted on page 6 of the Spring 2015 Class Schedule. NOW is the time to get advised, so that you can enroll early on and have the best chance for getting the classes and the kind of schedule you desire.

Transfer Planning

Planning to transfer to another college or university next fall? It is important to make sure that you are taking the proper courses to transfer to the program you wish AND to know when you should be applying. The professionals in the Counseling and Advising Center (U267) would be happy to assist with your transfer planning. Please note that the Center will be extremely busy over the next two months due to spring registration, but please be patient and get the help that you need.

Students who plan to attend Parkland in the fall 2015 semester can learn more about Parkland College and transfer to other colleges and universities by attending the upcoming free Student-Parent Information Night (SPIN) at Parkland this coming Thursday evening, October 30, from 6 p.m. until 7:45 p.m. in the new Student Union. Click here for further information and for a registration link.

Top Five Resume Mistakes

We critique a lot of resumes in the Parkland College Career Center (more than 600/year, but who’s counting?!). Here are the mistakes we see students make most often:

1) Wrong college name. Our college name is “Parkland College,” not “Parkland Community College.”
2) Your name doesn’t stand out. Enlarge and bold it!
3) Work experience isn’t stated in the right ‘tense’. If you’re no longer performing the work, you ‘did’ it. If you’re still performing the work, you’re ‘doing’ it.
4) You don’t list (or even know) your professional strengths. If you can’t sell your strengths, why should they hire you?
5) You don’t state your correct degree program. “Close enough” isn’t close enough.

Now that you’re armed with a better resume, want to know the hottest careers out there to get? You can pick up lots more information this Thursday, during Parkland’s Student-Parent Information Night. It’s  6 to 7:45 p.m. in Room U144.  You can even sign up there to win money that can help you take courses leading toward that new career.

While you’re at it, stop by and visit us at the Parkland College Career Center (Room U238)…your partner from the start!

Sandy and Rachel blog pic

 

Listen. Learn. Live…on WPCD

Did you know Parkland College has its own radio station on the FM dial? I didn’t either, until I took COM 141 (Basic Broadcast Announcing) as an elective and now, the rest is history!

WPCD 88.7  FM blasts new up and coming alternative artists as well as the forefathers of alternative music 24/7 and allows Parkland students the chance to hone their radio skills live on the air. To go along with their on-air training, students are tasked with making promotional spots and writing their own copy for public service announcements, news segments, and weather spots. There is also a chance to do live on-air spots from shows happening throughout Champaign-Urbana.

As you progress in the radio courses, there is an opportunity to interview bands and artists live in the studio or over the phone, which then allows you to use the editing skills you learned in class to produce an interview segment you can play during your radio show.  Whether you are into the music playing on WPCD or not, the experience you gain from the course work and on-air spots is an amazing one. It has given me much more confidence in other courses and in life as well.

Being on air at WPCD brings loads of real-life experience and gives you the feeling that you are actually working at a radio station. Even if radio isn’t your thing or your dream, being in an environment that promotes creativity while teaching life skills is an invaluable one that I would suggest to anyone who is attending Parkland!

 

Aron Ammann is a Virgo who likes long walks on the beach and spending time in the kitchen whipping up culinary masterpieces. He also enjoys spending time on 88.7 WPCD as the co-host of “The Mid-Morning Mess” alongside Chad Myler.  Aron stumbled upon the COM 141 class as an elective for his program of study and found that he really enjoyed the art of radio. An Iraq veteran, Aron has found his time on the air to be a therapeutic experience as well.

International Students on Parkland’s Football Teams

International students play football for Parkland College! Wha???? Parkland College has a football team?

Yes, Parkland does have a football team—two, actually. We have a women’s team and a men’s team.

Oh, sorry for the confusion about the reference to ‘football’. What the rest of the world calls ‘football’ we, in the US, call soccer.

Parkland College Soccer actionParkland College has had a football/soccer program for many years, and our international students have played, and continue to play, key roles in establishing our program as one of the best community college programs in the US. As you may know, football is played, from an early age, in all parts of the world. The US is a relative new-comer to the sport, so the global perspective and experience our international students bring to the game is highly valued.

Currently, the women’s team has four international students on the roster. The team is 12-3 overall on the season. They begin post-season play with the first match of the Region 24 tournament against Lincoln College at noon on Sunday, October 26. More information is available at: the women’s soccer schedule page.

The men’s team also has four international students on the roster and are currently ranked #22 in NJCAA poll. The men’s team is also tearing it up on the soccer field at 12-3. They begin post-season play with a match against Lincoln Land in the Region 24 tournament on Saturday, October 25 at noon. Find out more information at: the men’s soccer schedule page.

First Week as a Flight Student

[The following was written by a current student at the Parkland College Institute of Aviation at the University of Illinois.]

The first week was all about the paperwork and making sure that we, the new students, knew what was going to happen during the semester in case there were any last-minute doubts or questions. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) became much stricter about who can learn to fly in the United States since 9/11. This is the reason for a fair amount of the paperwork that I had to fill out.

After the paperwork came the online reading about the maneuvers we would learn throughout the semester and how to properly execute those. I am still working my way through the reading a second time as I get to each item in my flight time.

The first flight was learning basic hand-foot-eye coordination and figuring out which instruments to watch and how to use them properly. The coordination part was mostly figuring out what straight and level flight looks like on both the actual and artificial horizon. Once I got that part down, or at least I thought I had (turns out I wasn’t quite at the right speed so now I seem to always climb just a bit), I moved on to making climbs, descents, and turns. This part was simple and will be the building block for the rest of my training.

Flying has always been fun for me even though I still occasionally get motion sickness, and it is even more fun now that I am at the controls. Takeoff and landing are starting to become fluent, although the landings are still a bit flat, and I think I’m getting pretty good about hitting my mark. The radios are simple now that I have learned what to expect and how to reply properly dependent on the situation; eventually, the controllers won’t even know it’s a newbie talking to them.

Hopefully, soon, I will stop considering myself a newbie too, even though I know someone with about 12,000 hours. I have 14.

Go ahead, get ahead.