Category Archives: General

50th Annual Agriculture Banquet Celebrates Student Award Winners, Alumni


The Agriculture and Horticulture programs at Parkland College are excited to celebrate the 50th Agriculture Banquet on Tuesday, February 27, in the college’s Student Union.

All supporters, contributors, program alumni, and business partners are invited to join us as we recognize outstanding students, honor program supporters, and celebrate the past, present, and future of agriculture, horticulture, and precision agriculture at Parkland.

Contact Chris at 217/351-2481 or to RSVP.


[Aimee Densmore is program manager for Agriculture/Engineering Science and Technologies at Parkland College.]

Celebrating 10 years of the Pathway to Illinois Partnership!

For a decade now, hundreds of students have started at Parkland College through the Parkland Pathway to Illinois Program and graduated successfully from the University of Illinois.

Parkland Pathway to Illinois is a two-year program where you attend Parkland College for your general education classes but can also take one class a semester at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  The program gives you the benefit of small classes with dedicated faculty from Parkland combined with the enormous opportunities available at a world-class institution like the University of Illinois. Plus, your tuition will be based on your Parkland residency rate. Parkland Pathway really is the “best of both worlds.”

At the end of your two years in the program, you are guaranteed a slot into the junior class in your major as long as you have maintained the college GPA for transfer.

Selection for the Pathway program’s 2018-2019 session is starting Feb. 15, and Parkland College is hosting its annual information session on Sunday, Feb. 11  for you to learn more.

If you are a soon-to-graduate high school senior or are a junior who would like more information, please sign up to attend the Parkland Pathway Information Open House, Sunday, Feb. 11 from 1 to 3 p.m. in the Student Union on the Parkland campus. In addition to an overall explanation of the program, counselors from each of the UIUC participating colleges will be present with their Parkland College counterpart. Come and get answers to both your Parkland and UIUC questions.

For more information and to RSVP for this event, please click here.

[Mary Kay Smith is a student services advisor in Admissions and Records.]


Stalking: Know It. Name It. Stop It.


Our message this week:  National Stalking Awareness Month.


January is National Stalking Awareness Month, a time to focus on a crime that affected 7.5 million victims in one year.

The theme, “Stalking: Know It. Name It. Stop It.”, challenges the nation to fight this dangerous crime by learning more about it.

Stalking is a crime in all 50 states, the U.S. Territories and the District of Columbia, yet many victims and criminal justice professionals underestimate its seriousness and impact. In one of five cases, stalkers use weapons to harm or threaten victims, and stalking is one of the significant risk factors for femicide (homicide of women) in abusive relationships.

Victims suffer anxiety, social dysfunction, and severe depression at much higher rates than the general population, and many lose time from work or have to move as a result of their victimization.

Stalking is difficult to recognize, investigate, and prosecute. Unlike other crimes, stalking is not a single, easily identifiable crime but a series of acts, a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause that person fear. Stalking may take many forms, such as assaults, threats, vandalism, burglary, or animal abuse, as well as unwanted cards, calls, gifts, or visits. One in four victims reports that the stalker uses technology, such as computers, global positioning system devices, or hidden cameras, to track the victim’s daily activities.

Stalkers fit no standard psychological profile, and many stalkers follow their victims from one jurisdiction to another, making it difficult for authorities to investigate and prosecute their crimes. Communities that understand stalking, however, can support victims and combat the crime.

As we work more to raise awareness and recognition of stalking, we have a better chance to protect victims and prevent tragedies. If you or someone you know is a victim of stalking, please don’t hesitate to approach any of the Parkland College police officers or call us at 217/351-2369.

For further information on this issue, please visit:


This article was originally  posted in January 2017.


[Ben Boltinghouse is a public safety officer with Parkland College.]

Free LIFE Clinic Helps Those with Pain

Do you know someone who lives with pain every day or has difficulty completing simple to more complex day-to-day activities? Tell them about Parkland College’s Learning Information for Everyday (LIFE) Clinic, offered by our Occupational Therapy Assistant program, because we can help.

We started the LIFE Clinic two years ago as a FREE service to our community. That’s right, free. For those in our communities who come and see us, we can offer simple strategies to conserve energy or recommend or construct an assistive device to help them navigate their activities better.

What do people think about our LIFE Clinic services? One of our clients, who experiences pain in her right hand, had this to say last spring:

Modification fabricated by OTA students.

“I had no idea of what occupational therapy assistants did. They developed creative contraptions to help me be able to walk my dogs and pour water from gallon glass jugs with much less pain. The students were kind, professional, very pleasant ,and helpful. I was impressed! It was a good day when I met Michelle and her students! Thank you so much!”

If you or someone you know could benefit from the LIFE Clinic at Parkland College, just give us a call at 217/353-2782. For Spring Semester 2018, the LIFE Clinic will offer services Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., March 1, 8, 15, and 29.

[Michelle Roberts is the OTA program director at Parkland College.]

Holiday Fire Prevention Tips

The holiday season is the most dangerous time of the year for house fires, whether it’s cooking in an overly cluttered kitchen, lighting too many candles around the home, or stringing up old or damaged holiday lights. Consider the following tips from the U.S. Fire Administration on how to prevent house fires during the holidays.

  • Keep candles 12 inches away from things that can burn, and consider using flameless battery-operated candles.
  • Place candles in a sturdy candleholder that will not tip over, and never leave a burning candle alone.
  • Throw away holiday light strands with frayed or pinched wires, and turn off all your holiday lights before going to bed or leaving your home.
  • Water your Christmas tree every day, as a dry tree can very easily catch fire. Get rid of your Christmas tree soon after Christmas or whenever it dries out.

We hope you have a safe and refreshing holiday break!


[Ben Boltinghouse is a public safety officer with Parkland College.]