Category Archives: Health & Wellness

Get Into Stress-LESS Week at Parkland!

This week, Phi Theta Kappa is hosting “Stress-Less Week.” We’ve scheduled a variety of events at the campus to help you take the stress off these last few weeks of the fall semester. Please join us if you can for the following events:

Tough-It-Out Tuesday
Tuesday, December 8

  • Martial Arts Demonstration, 12:30 to 1pm,  U-Wing cafeteria stage
  • Tug of War*,  1pm, P-Wing gym
    *Gloves and tennis shoes are required to participate in tug of war. We will try to provide a certain number of gloves, but bring your own, just in case.

We’re-Here-for-You Wednesday
Wednesday, December 9

  • Mental Health Awareness Fair, noon to 2pm, Student Union (U Wing)

Throwback Thursday
Thursday, December 10

  • Jigsaw Puzzles and Coloring Books, 10am to noon, Flag Lounge (X Wing)
  • Storytelling,  noon to 1pm , U-Wing cafeteria stage
  • Finals Survival Kit Distribution and C4 Signing, 4:30 to 5:30pm, Student Union (U Wing)

Feeling Good Friday
Friday, December 11

  • Therapy Dogs Visit, 9 to 11am, Flag Lounge (X Wing)
  • Massages (free), 11am to 1pm, Gallery Lounge (X Wing)
  • Lunch and Learn: Stress Management Workshop, noon to 1pm, U140 (Free lunches for attendees. They will be given on a first come, first serve basis.)
  • Finals Survival Kit Distribution and C4 Signing, 1:30 to 2:30pm in the Student Union (U Wing)

We are also conducting a donation drive for the Cunningham Children’s Home. Due to their limited storage space, they will only accept NEW donations. (No USED donations please.) A full list of accepted donations can be found at their website: http://www.cunninghamhome.org/giving. We have the full wish list posted in the College Center (X Wing by the library stairs) in the far left display case. We will be collecting monetary and physical donations at our events and physical donations ONLY at the donation collection points around campus.

The donation collection points can be found at the following locations:

  • Student Union (U Wing)
  • College Center (X Wing)
  • Natural Sciences department office (L Wing)
  • Fine & Applied Arts department office (C Wing), Social Sciences department office (D Wing)
  • Business & Agri-Business department office (B Wing)
  • Mathematics department office (M Wing)

We would really appreciate your help and support for this donation drive!

New Heart-Rate Tech Helps Teams, Trainers

Parkland College’s new Polar Team Pro heart rate telemetry system contains technology primarily used by professional and collegiate sports teams to track training volume.  Parkland acquired the system when it was released internationally this summer; we were the first to have the system in the United States.

Our Cobras Women’s Soccer team is currently using the system to make sure they are not over- or under-training during their competitive season. But they’re not the only ones benefiting from this new technology. Dalton Swenson, one of our student trainers, explains below.

 

Training Tool. The athlete wears the transmitter during games and competitions, and it records multiple data points for that person. Inside the transmitter is an accelerometer, gyroscope, heart rate monitor, and GPS, as well as other technologies. As the athlete trains outdoors, Polar has 13 satellites that look for the signal. When four satellites pick up the signal, the athlete’s position on earth is monitored, as well as her speed of movement, change of direction, etc.

So, the athlete/coach can review the practice/game and see exactly where the athelete was during every second of that session, what their heart rate was at the time, how fast they were moving, etc. All of the data points objectively help tell the athlete how hard the session was for her on that day, and how long she will need to recover from it. It will also give total calories burned during the session so the athlete knows how much food she needs to refuel.

Learning Tool. Our Parkland Kinesiology students are learning the system and are helping the intercollegiate coaching staffs here interpret the data to give practical advice to student athletes on training intensity, training volume, nutrition, and recovery strategies. It gives our students experience with a product that is typically seen with world-class soccer programs (such as our United States women’s team), the NBA, NFL, and Division I football and basketball.

If they want to become a strength and conditioning coach, or work in the growing field of analytics, this technology gives them a huge leg up on the competition. It also aids the personal trainer or physical education instructor who is going to work with a different clientele, but where heart-rate telemetry can be highly effective in aiding the client.

For the regular person, there are inexpensive heart-rate transmitters that an individual could use to get similar information on their own workouts. Obviously they won’t be as fancy or intricate as this system, but they will help you make important training decisions and get a clear understanding of how hard a session really was.

[Chris Warren is director of the Parkland Kinesiology program.]

Black Student SUCCESS: Emotional Intelligence

The term emotional Intelligence describes the ability to recognize one’s own and other people’s emotions, to identify feelings and label them appropriately, and to use that information to guide thinking and behavior.  High or successful emotional intelligence is critical in decision making, in developing and maintaining relationships, and in job performance.

In a Black Student SUCCESS Project workshop late last month, Parkland counselor Joe Omo-Osagie led students in a series of assessments designed to test their emotional self-awareness.  While there weren’t necessarily right or wrong answers, the questions definitely challenged students’ ways of thinking and highlighted areas where they might want to consider making changes.

The most sensitive, enlightened, and self-aware person among us can always use a boost of higher emotional intelligence. Take the short quiz below as an introductory guide to evaluating your own level of emotional intelligence. If you can honestly answer “True” to each statement, you can feel good about having a high degree of emotional intelligence. If you cannot, you might want to consider developing those skills. The payoff lasts a lifetime!

EI QUIZ

  1. I can usually let go of problems, hurt feelings, and anger and move on (self-control):  True or False
  2. I can usually engage in a conversation with someone and interpret that person’s body language signals (empathy):  True or False
  3. I can usually identify my emotions at any given moment  (self-awareness):  True or False
  4. I try to look at situations in a positive light (motivation):  True or False
  5. I can usually deal calmly and sensitively to the emotional displays of others, even if I don’t know all the details  (social competency):  True or False
  6. I can fairly easily admit mistakes and apologize (self-confidence):  True or False

[Donna Tanner-Harold is a counselor in Parkland’s Counseling and Advising Center and coordinates Black Student Success Project activities.]

 

T Building Tour: Come Celebrate LEED Smart Design!

Did you know that buildings consume nearly half the energy consumed in the United States—almost as much as industry and all forms of transportation combined? Smart design and technology choices can drastically reduce a building’s energy demand, however, and we have an example of such a building right here on campus.

The Parkhill Applied Technology Center (building T) is the first building on the Parkland campus to receive LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification, the leading green building rating system in the marketplace. Join us on October 29 at 11 a.m. to see a dedication of the T Building’s LEED plaque, followed by a building tour.

Jeff Johnson from BLDD Architects will lead a tour of the T Building to point out the features that make this a high-performance building. These include:

  • Extensive daylighting (access to natural light), which both lowers energy costs associated with artificial lighting and has been shown to increase worker productivity and raise student test scores
  • High-efficiency lighting to supplement the building’s daylighting scheme
  • A highly efficient geothermal heating system, which uses the naturally tempering thermal characteristics of the earth beneath the building to both heat and cool the building

T Building’s features represent the sort of energy efficiency improvements Parkland will implement over time to reach its goal of carbon neutrality by the year 2060 as outlined in the President’s Carbon Commitment. The commitment was signed by President Ramage in 2009.

October is Campus Sustainability Month at Parkland and activities were organized by the Sustainable Campus Committee. This tour is the main event for our final week of activities and focuses on the power of design to support sustainability goals. Look for Parkland’s Sustainability coordinator Thor Peterson from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesday, October 28 outside the café in the union to learn more about how you can support sustainability activities at Parkland.

EVENT DETAILS
Parkhill Applied Technology Center LEED Dedication Ceremony and Green Building Tour
Date: October 29, 2015
Time: 11 a.m.
Location: Building T, main entrance

Celebrate Surgical Technology Week with Us!

Happy National Surgical Technology Week!

This week, we celebrate the profession of surgical technology. Do you know what a surgical technologist is or does in surgery?

We serve as an integral part of the surgical team, standing next to and across from the surgeon during all surgical procedures. We’re either

  • handling the instrumentation and the medications for the patient
  • helping handle tissue, or
  • troubleshooting any thing that may arise.

We are credentialed professionals and vital surgical team members.

Mvc-040In 1979, the very first evening I worked at a large hospital in St. Louis, I experienced a procedure where a patient came in with incredible and life-threatening injuries. While I was overwhelmed, I knew that I had chosen the right career field, because we worked as a team, the surgeon, the assistants, and the nurses. With very little verbal communication, everyone knew what to do.

We have to think on our feet everyday and stay focused on the goal. I love the challenge of always trying to anticipate the surgeon’s moves to be the best surgical technologist. I still enjoy the intensity as well as the gentle care we provide patients in order to produce the best outcomes possible.

So, let’s celebrate the hidden health care team member!
Join us for Open House Mock Operating Rooms this week.

Tuesday 1-3 p.m. and Friday 10-noon in Room L143

Questions? C ontact Carolyn Ragsdale, program director, at cragsdale@parkland.edu.