All posts by Ben Boltinghouse

April: Sexual Assault Awareness Month

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, a time when we recognize and focus efforts to combat the damage that sexual violence has on our society.

Sexual violence occurs when someone is forced or coerced into unwanted sexual activity without agreeing or consenting. Reasons someone might not be able to consent include fear, being underage, having an illness or disability, or being incapacitated due to alcohol and other drugs. Consent initially can be given and then later withdrawn.

Sexual violence is a crime that comes in many forms, including forced intercourse, sexual contact or touching, sexual harassment, sexual exploitation, and exposure or voyeurism. Sexual violence is never the victim’s fault. It doesn’t matter what the victim is wearing or doing, whether the victim has been drinking, or what type of relationship the victim has with the person who is committing the abuse.

If you or someone you know has been the victim of sexual violence, Parkland College has a fully trained team of counselors who can help you process the situation, as well as police officers to pursue criminal charges.

[Ben Boltinghouse is a public safety officer with Parkland College.]

Five Tips for Enjoying Spring Break…Safely

Parkland College’s spring break is just around the corner, so here are five tips for staying safe during the break:

Stick together
If you’re going on a trip with a group of friends, you’ll all be safest if you stick together. Should one of you decide to leave a party early or go on a solo shopping trip, make sure others in your group know where you’re going and how long you’ll be.

Keep an eye on your money
You don’t want to get stranded in a new and unfamiliar place without any money, so be sure to bring enough to last you the whole trip. If you carry cash, try to keep the amount you take with you on routine excursions to a minimum. Try distributing your money in various places among your belongings and accommodations so that if by chance you lose some or it’s stolen, you’ll still have more elsewhere.

Alcohol and you
Most spring break trips involve some level of alcohol-related activities, and while you may be safest if you don’t partake, the reality is, that will probably not be the case. Being smart about the way you drink is the next best thing, and that involves being cognizant of the risks of alcohol poisoning, selecting a designated driver if you’ve got to travel, and being wary of accepting drinks from strangers.

Safe sex
Should you decide to have sex during spring break, take the necessary precautions to protect against unwanted pregnancy and STDs/STIs. Make sure that consent has been explicitly and freely established between all parties before engaging in sexual activities.

Use proper activity gear
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that accidental injuries kill more Americans age 30 and under than any other cause of death. With this in mind, be sure to wear those seat belts and use life vests, knee pads, and other appropriate gear, especially before venturing out to some high-risk activity.

Have a fun—and safe—spring break!

[Ben Boltinghouse is a public safety officer with Parkland College.]

Women’s History Month

Women’s History Month, celebrated annually during March in the U.S., highlights the contributions of women to events in history and society. Today, we highlight five inventions by women that have had an impact in the fields of police, fire, and emergency medical services (EMS) that make all our lives safer.

1. In 1887, Anna Connelly patented the first fire escape bridge, allowing people who escaped to the rooftop to make their way to a neighboring building during a fire. Fire escapes are essential to residents’ and first responders’ rescue efforts in the event of a fire.

2. In 1969, Marie Van Brittan Brown, a nurse, was the first person to develop a patent for home closed-circuit television security. Her invention became the framework for the modern closed-circuit television system that is widely used for surveillance, crime prevention, and traffic monitoring.

3. Dr. Grace Murray Hopper, a rear admiral in the U.S. Navy and computer scientist, invented COBOL,  the first user-friendly business computer software system in the 1940s. Thanks to Dr. Hopper, her program was later adapted by other computer scientists and modified for fire and EMS programs.

 

4. DuPont chemist Stephanie Kwolek invented Kevlar in 1966 while she was trying to create a material to make stronger tires. She wove the material into a fiber, and the forerunner for firefighter gear and ballistic vests was born.

5. In WWII, to aid in the deployment of radio-controlled torpedoes, Hedy Lamarr made significant contributions to the field of frequency hopping in radio technology. This development paved the way for everything from Wi-Fi to GPS.

[Ben Boltinghouse is a public safety officer with Parkland College.]

Drunk Driving: Get the Facts

****This post has been edited to provide the most up-to-date information.***
FACT:   An estimated 32% of fatal car crashes involve an intoxicated driver or pedestrian. *

FACT: Car crashes are the leading cause of death for teens, and about a quarter of those crashes involve an underage drinking driver. **

FACT: On average, one in three people will be involved in a drunk driving crash in their lifetime.*

Alcohol, drugs, and driving simply do not go together. Driving requires a person’s attentiveness and the ability to make quick decisions on the road, to react to changes in the environment and execute specific, often difficult maneuvers behind the wheel. When drinking alcohol, using drugs, or being distracted for any reason, driving becomes dangerous—and potentially lethal!

Consuming alcohol prior to driving greatly increases the risk of car accidents, highway injuries, and vehicular deaths. The greater the amount of alcohol consumed, the more likely a person is to be involved in an accident. When any amount of alcohol is consumed, many of the skills that safe driving requires—judgment, concentration, comprehension, coordination, visual acuity, and reaction time—become impaired.

Being convicted of driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol can impact your life in ways you may not be aware of, including loss of employment, prevention of employment in certain jobs, higher insurance rates, serious financial setbacks, personal and family embarrassment, and possible incarceration.

Americans know the terrible consequences of drunk driving and are becoming more aware of the dangers of distracted driving. Drugged driving poses similar threats to public safety because drugs have adverse effects on judgment, reaction time, motor skills, and memory. When misused, prescription drugs, over-the-counter drugs, and illegal drugs can impair perception, judgment, motor skills, and memory.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s National Roadside Survey, more than 16% of weekend, nighttime drivers tested positive for illegal, prescription, or over-the-counter medications (11% tested positive for illegal drugs). In 2009, 18% of fatally injured drivers tested positive for at least one drug (illegal, prescription and/or over-the-counter).

*National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)
**Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services
     Administration (SAMHSA)

[Ben Boltinghouse is a public safety officer with Parkland College.]

Learn CPR. Save a Life.

The American Heart Association reports that in the case of a sudden collapse, immediate CPR can double or even triple a person’s chances of survival. Learning CPR can save lives and is an easy way to keep you from feeling powerless if disaster strikes.

Act Fast
Most people who experience cardiac arrest at home, at work, or in a public location die because they don’t receive immediate CPR from someone on the scene. As a bystander, don’t be afraid. Your actions can only help. When calling 911, you will be asked for your location. Be specific, especially if you’re calling from a mobile phone as that is not associated with a fixed address. Answering the dispatcher’s questions will not delay the arrival of help.

Take a CPR Class
Parkland College offers a CPR course through Community Education that’s geared towards Health Professions students but is still accessible to community members. More information is available here.

Classes are also available at both Carle and Presence Hospitals that are more directed toward general community members. Further information on those classes can be found at their sites:

CPR at Carle

CPR at Presence

[Ben Boltinghouse is a public safety officer with Parkland College.]